Spotlight – Christine Minnix: Director of University Recruiting

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director of university recruiting

The non-clinical spotlight series exists to shed light on all of the interesting paths that physical therapy professionals have taken. Today’s spotlight focuses on Christine Minnix, MS, DPT, who went from physical therapist to director of university recruiting.

Want to be featured on The Non-Clinical PT? Know of someone who’d be a great person to interview? Please reach out today!


 

What is your full name and title?

Christine M Minnix, MS, DPT. My title is now Director of University Recruiting/Clinical Education Coordinator. I work at PT Solutions Physical Therapy.

Where did you attend PT school, when did you graduate, and what made you choose PT?

I went to University of Miami for PT School and graduated in 2010. I went into PT following a friend’s advice that I may like it. I truly didn’t know what it was in college and originally thought I was going to do pharmaceutical sales.

What did you like best about PT? Least?

I really enjoyed helping patients of all backgrounds but was primarily in outpatient. I enjoyed getting to see my patients’ progress and being part of their lives.

I think the thing I liked least was documentation. Haha, I am not sure who likes that aspect!

At what point did you start feeling like you might want to do something else?

While practicing, we had to do our own physician marketing and I really liked the mornings when I got to go out do that. I loved the physicians I worked with and enjoyed getting to spend time with them.

Marketing to MDs seemed to combine my prior ambition of pharmaceutical sales with physical therapy. I went into school thinking at some point (possibly 10 years down the line) I would be in a more admin or non-clinical PT role, but didn’t know the path of recruiting existed then.

Did anything in particular influence your decision to go non-clinical?

I noticed an opportunity with Maryland Sportscare and Rehab, just prior to their transition to Pivot Physical Therapy (a company with whom I had interviewed a few years back for a clinic director role).

The role I noticed was for a physical therapist recruiter position and thought to myself, “I could do that!” I consulted some friends who were recruiters and they encouraged me to apply.

I was at a point in my career where I thought if I didn’t do something now, I would be in this same role for the foreseeable future.

At the time that I applied for the recruiting role, I was working as a physical therapy director. It wasn’t a bad role, but at the company I was with, I noticed the people above me weren’t going anywhere and didn’t see any real growth for me there.

What are you doing now?

I currently oversee all recruiting for GA and FL as well as all university recruitment at PT Solutions Physical Therapy.

What does your role look like?

It varies day to day, from talking with potential candidates for our open positions, to showing them our headquarters in Kennesaw, Georgia if they are in the area.

On other days, I’ll be traveling to all major career fairs and national events for the practice. I will do a lot of set up, coordination, and tear-down for these events.

We do have an orthopedic residency that is a large part of our practice, and a lot of the recruiting I get to do is for that program.

I love that each day is so different and I am always kept on my toes.

What are pros/cons of your current role?

The pros are I get to help students with their first jobs and be a sounding board for them.

I always loved taking students in the clinic. This role is very similar, but amplified, and I really love that.

The cons are that there is still the paperwork side 🙂 I guess I didn’t realize documentation existed everywhere. We have an applicant tracking system where we document all of our new hires and potential hires.

What steps did you take to get there? Was it easy? Difficult? Did you have to network? Work for free/shadow?

I was blessed enough to be offered a chance by Maryland Sportscare and Rehab (Pivot Physical Therapy) to start with them as their talent acquisition manager.

They liked that I was a PT and could relate to the candidates who would be working for the practice and speak the lingo to them.

I really have them to thank for the change in trajectory of my career.

How did you change your resume/cover letter to apply for different jobs?

Now that I have the recruiting experience under my belt, I am able to highlight the roles I have and positions I have been filling.

What would you suggest for someone looking to follow your path?

I would suggest asking to attend the career fair that your alma mater has, to start, since you will have connections within the school and be able to talk about where you have come from since graduation.

What would you say to a PT who is feeling guilty about switching gears?

I would say you can help people in multiple ways in life. While patient care is one avenue, leaving patient care is also great!

There are other opportunities for us to use our knowledge for good, both in and out of patient care. 🙂


Thanks for your insight, Christine!

Want to be featured? Know someone who should? Reach out today!

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